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Hummingbird nectar... You've been doing it wrong!

My apologies for the click bait title. It is a bit of a joke at the countless articles that insist you are wrong in doing countless trivial things. I'm not really here to tell you about any wrong doing, but to educate. Hummingbirds have a max forward flight speed of 30 mph and can reach up to 60 mph in a dive maneuver. Hummingbirds also need to consume about ½ their weight in sugar daily, feeding an average of 5 to 8 times per hour. So lets feed some hummingbirds. Break out some ingredients: - Sucrose (sugar water/nectar) - Sodium Benzoate (preservative) - Tartaric Acid (preservative) - Red #40 (petroleum based food coloring) If you are wondering why I didn't stop at...

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Life and Death

In my last blog, I told everyone about the new tenants occupying my birdhouse, mounted with a Post Host bracket. A pair of beautiful bluebirds made this house their home and spent days building a nest, which barely weeks later became home to 6 tiny blue eggs. When they finally hatched, it was quite apparent. The chirping got me quite excited. I've observed the couple daily, flying back and forth to their nest to feed six little ones. Many times, they'd arrive on the fence around the same time, worm or caterpillar in mouth, looking around to make sure the time was right , The female would fly into the birdhouse, and an unmistakable choir of chirping peaked instantly, and...

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How to Mount a Birdhouse on a Fence Post using the Post Host® Birdhouse Mounting Kit

Below is a video we put together a few months ago illustrating the ease of installing a birdhouse on a metal 2 3/8" galvanized fence post using the Post Host® birdhouse mounting kit. The installation is simple, quick, and only requires a tape measure and a Phillips screw driver. The bracket system is made of aluminum and the supplied screws are stainless steel, so they won't rust. Whether you own the fence or your neighbor does, there is zero risk of damage in accessorizing the fence post with the Post Host® bracket systems, as no screws or bolts have to be driven into the fence post. The birdhouse can be adjusted, removed, or relocated leaving no evidence behind. Get yours...

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My First Bluebirds

I'm going to try to tell this story without making any cliche'd remarks about stopping to "smell the roses", but I do want to share this one. I installed a bluebird house on my fence post several months ago, in fact, it was the first official Post Host® installation. Since then, I've been waiting anxiously for a bird of any kind to drop in. I checked on an almost weekly basis only to find an empty house every time (except one time there was a spider web).   I figured this was a valuable lesson in patience. To give a bit of backstory of my life, I'm an engineer, and had been unhappy in my job for a while (Post...

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Fence Post Mounted Birdhouses and Feeders Made Easy

Update: How to mount a birdhouse to a metal fence post --> Video here <-- In my previous post, I introduced Post Host to the world, covering some of the solutions this bracket system offered for the "ugly side" of the fence. I'm sure not everyone considers the post side to be ugly; some are simply impartial. But one thing is for certain, if you have a portion of fencing with the posts on your side...it's time to accessorize! One of my favorite uses is for mounting birdhouses and feeders. Bird watching is a year-round hobby, and it's always nice to have some wildlife in your backyard, and if you have steel fence posts, your mounting options are limited.  The...

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